Log in

Register




Mae Sai (Thailand), July 12, 2018 (AFP) - Rescuers who pulled a young Thai football team from deep inside a flooded cave were dismantling their worksite on Thursday, as plans emerged to turn the spot into a museum in tribute to the daring operation.

At least one film production house was already working on a scheme to make a Hollywood treatment out of the heroics of divers, cavers and medics who risked their lives to free the "Wild Boars".

Stunning footage of that rescue was released on Wednesday showing the youngsters -- aged 11 to 16 -- being stretchered to safety.

They were also seen sitting cheerfully in their hospital beds, where they are being kept in isolation until doctors are sure they did not pick up any nasty diseases during more than two weeks in the dark.

Workers were Thursday packing up the industrial water pumps, heavy-grade machinery and construction equipment at the mouth of the Tham Luang cave, which had been a high-tech command centre during the 18-day ordeal.

Rescue chief Narongsak Osottanakorn told reporters the site would ultimately be converted into a museum showcasing the clothes and equipment used during the dramatic rescue.

"I believe it will become another highlight in Thailand," he said. "Tourists will come visit."

About 50 people were working at the site, National Park ranger Pinitpong Wongma told AFP, adding that he expected work would continue until at least Sunday.

"Nobody is allowed to go inside the cave at all even though there is still a lot of equipment there because water levels have been rising since the rescue mission," he said.

The rescue of the "Wild Boars" team was still being celebrated in Thailand as the 12 boys and their 25-year-old coach recovered in a local hospital.

The Nation newspaper called the operation a "Triumph of global co-operation" on its front page Thursday while the Bangkok Post published a collage of images of those involved under the heading "You Are Heroes."

The saga started on June 23 when the players walked into the Tham Luang cave complex after football practice and were trapped when monsoon flooding blocked their exit.

Nine days later British divers found the dishevelled and hungry group perched on a ledge four kilometres inside the cave.

Over the following week, experts from around the world descended on northern Thailand and rescuers pumped out more than 50 Olympic-sized swimming pools-worth of water.

A huge media pack of more than 1,000 journalists gathered at the mouth of the cave feeding audiences all over the globe with every twist and turn of the dramatic rescue until its joyful conclusion on Tuesday.

The huge international interest in the story sparked immediate talk of books and films.

Michael Scott, the managing partner of faith-based production house Pure Flix, said the company intends to pursue a film about the against-the-odds mission.

Scott, who lives in Thailand and went to the site in Chiang Rai as the boys were being pulled to safety, made the announcement late Tuesday on Twitter in a video.

"We're here really looking at this as a movie that could inspire millions of people across the globe," Scott said.

LA PAZ, July 5, 2018 (News Wires) — Bolivia is to build an underwater museum in its sacred Lake Titicaca, the culture minister said.

The move comes after thousands of priceless artifacts were discovered at the bottom of the abyss.

“It will be both a tourist complex and a centre for archaeological, geological and biological research, which will make it the only one in the world,” culture minister Wilma Alanoca said this week.

The museum will cost US$10 million to build, in partnership with Belgian development agency Enabel. Alanoca said Belgium and UNESCO would contribute US$2 million to the project.

Titicaca holds an important place in the hearts of local people — legend has it that Manco Capac, the son of the Sun God and his wife Mama Ocllo, emerged from its waters.

One of the main figures in Inca mythology, Manco Capac is believed to have founded the Peruvian city of Cusco, the historic capital of the Inca Empire from the 13th to 16th centuries.

Titicaca spans an area of 8,500 square kilometres and straddles the border between Bolivia and Peru. At more than 3,800 meters altitude, it is the world’s highest body of fresh water that is navigable by large vessels.

It was the birthplace of several local cultures before the arrival of Spanish colonialists.

The most recent excavations turned up 10,000 artefacts, made from bone, ceramics and metal, cooking utensils, as well as human and animal remains, dating back to the pre-Tiwanaku (before 300 AD), Tiwanaku (300-1100) and Inca (1100-1570) eras.

The museum will be situated close to the town of San Pedro de Tiquina, around 100km from the capital La Paz.

LA PAZ, July 4, 2018 (News Wires) - Bolivia is to build an underwater museum in its sacred Lake Titicaca, the culture minister said.

The move comes after thousands of priceless artifacts were discovered at the bottom of the abyss.

"It will be both a tourist complex and a centre for archeological, geological and biological research, which will make it the only one in the world," culture minister Wilma Alanoca said on Tuesday.

The museum will cost $10 million (8.6 million euros) to build, in partnership with Belgian development agency Enabel. Alanoca said Belgium and Unesco would contribute $2 million to the project.

Titicaca holds an important place in the hearts of local people -- legend has it that Manco Capac, the son of the Sun God and his wife Mama Ocllo, emerged from its waters.

One of the main figures in Inca mythology, Manco Capac is believed to have founded the Peruvian city of Cusco, the historic capital of the Inca Empire from the 13th to 16th centuries.

Titicaca spans an area of 8,500 square kilometres (3,300 square miles) and straddles the border between Bolivia and Peru. At more than 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) altitude, it is the world's highest body of fresh water that is navigable by large vessels.

It was the birthplace of several local cultures before the arrival of Spanish colonialists.

The most recent excavations turned up 10,000 artefacts, made from bone, ceramics and metal, cooking utensils, as well as human and animal remains, dating back to the pre-Tiwanaku (before 300 AD), Tiwanaku (300-1100) and Inca (1100-1570) eras.

The museum will be situated close to the town of San Pedro de Tiquina, around 100 kilometers from the capital La Paz.

A grand opening

 

By the Gazette Editorial Board

The Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM), which is still under construction, is a huge project which will be the country's pride and joy. It will be the largest display facility in the world.

According to the Minister of Antiquities, Khaled el-Anani, the museum will be partially inaugurated by the end of this year or early next year. The partial opening seems to be part of the government's plan to promote tourism which has started to pick up pace after a few years of stagnation.

The fact is that archaeology and cultural heritage are major assets of the country's tourism industry. The new museum, which will display the complete 5,000-piece collection of King Tutankhamun as part of its total display capacity of 100,000 items, is expected to promote the country's cultural potential.

For this reason, some experts have argued against the partial inauguration of such a significant project which is attracting world attention. They say that the museum deserves a grand opening when it is fully completed as scheduled in 2022.

The GEM has been situated in an extremely unique location, close to the Pyramids Plateau, so as to create an integrated environment that encompasses the pyramids and the artefacts displayed within.  This association is expressed in the design of the museum building, which has been inspired by the architecture of the pyramids.

The museum and the plateau should, therefore, be regarded as an integrated unit to be marketed via a variety of programmes, according to a comprehensive plan that takes into consideration the accessibility of sites in the vicinity, means of transport and environmental aspects.

Of late, the Pyramids Plateau has been undergoing an upgrading process. But there are still shortcomings that should be addressed if the ministry is planning to make a real difference to the place especially with the propaganda being made about the GEM. Minister Anani has said that the museum will dazzle the world. Indeed, it will, but the surroundings should be in harmony with the grandeur inside. It must be said that the approach to the Pyramids Plateau still needs to be cleaned up, especially in the area of Nazlet el-Semman village.

The ministry should reconsider the decision to open part, not all the museum. It would be unbecoming for tourists to visit the museum before the workers have left the site. And the tourists should have access to the annexed services, so they can enjoy their visit to the maximum.

Egypt should know how to make the best use of the rich cultural heritage of its civilisation that is several thousand years old.

By: Salwa Samir

Yes. You read the headline correctly. There was a doctor called Naguib Mahfouz. Millions of Egyptians and Arabs know the literary legend Naguib Mahfouz, the writer of the notable work, the Cairo Trilogy. Egypt’s other Naguib Mahfouz, is less famous than the Nobel laureate.

Inside El-Kasr El-Aini School of Medicine in central Cairo there is a medical gem that dates back to 1930. It is the Middle East and Africa’s oldest and most comprehensive depository of gynaecological and obstetrical pathologic specimens.

It is called, the Museum of Naguib Mahfouz Pasha (1882-1974), the founder of Egypt’s first dedicated Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) service at the University.

Dr Ahmed El-Minawi, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Kasr El-Aini School of Medicine and the Museum Curator, said, “The museum contains some 1350 jars of the obstetrics and gynaecology specimens obtained from Dr Mahfouz’ operations.”

The displayed specimens cover a large range of common and rare obstetrical and gynaecological conditions.

The story began at the beginning of the 20th Century when Professor Mahfouz decided to study Obstetrics because of the suffering he saw women go through at that time.

So, in 1905 he convinced the Dean of the Kasr El-Aini Medical School, Dr Keating, to allow him to start an obstetrics and gynaecology service, the first of its kind in Egypt.

During those early years, Dr Mahfouz treated thousands of cases and collected very rare specimens which he later donated to be displayed in the Museum.

The museum achieved high acclaim and its specimens were catalogued in a British-published three-volume atlas in 1947.

In 1945, the museum was described by the then President of England’s Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists,Sir Eardley Holland, as “a remarkable collection” and ” a wonderful monument to the name of its founder”.

The museum is primarily dedicated to aiding in the education, training and continuing professional development of doctors.

Dr El-Minawi said that the museum was using digital technology to make it easier for students and visitors in general to access the collection by using QR (quick response) codes to provide more detailed information to the visitor and a description of the pathology specimens.

The museum is equipped with dioramas to facilitate the provision of historical information and for descriptive purposes.

The Ob/Gyn Department has established an annual award for major scientific contributions to the field of Ob/Gyn, whether locally or internationally with the aim of showing gratitude to, and in commemoration of, Professor Mahfouz.

The first recipient was Professor Kypros Nicolaides of King’s College in the UK, for his substantial contributions to Fetal Medicine.

He received the Award in Cairo in March 2018. The award is a large medal, made of 950 Silver, weighing a substantial 380gms, with a bust of Professor Mahfouz on the front.

VICTORIA, Canada, May 16, 2018 (News Wires) - The Royal B.C. Museum has had its share of blockbuster exhibitions, and the upcoming Egypt: The Time of Pharaohs is the equal of any of them, says museum chief executive Jack Lohman. “It’s one of the greatest shows, I think, this museum has ever put on.”

The exhibition opens on Friday and continues until Dec. 31. The film Mysteries of Egypt will play at the Imax Victoria Theatre throughout the run.

Victoria is the show’s only scheduled Canadian stop, but it has some American destinations and interest has been expressed by a museum in Sydney, Australia.

Lohman said the ancient Egyptian civilization the show depicts “marks the dawn of the human spirit” and has been unveiled through the work of generations of archeologists.

The first section of the exhibit delves into the Nile River, considered the civilization’s lifeline. Lohman said the show looks not just at those in power, but at many other facets of life in ancient Egypt.

“When you think of ancient Egypt, you think of these great pyramids, you think of the Sphinx, you think of granite obelisks — all these monuments,” Lohman said. “Well, it wasn’t practical to bring these monumental pieces here.

“But what we have done is we’ve brought 330 absolutely exquisite pieces from some of the finest archeological collections.”

The artifacts on display provide a special look at the past, Lohman said.

He said they are “vestiges of history” that cover a large time span, and there is a sense of intimacy from being so close to them.

Wafaa El Saddik, former director the Egyptian Museum of Cairo, also pointed to the varied overview of the civilization.

“It has many different aspects,” she said. “The exhibition is unique because it’s showing the life of the ancient Egyptian, not only the very famous objects of the pharaohs and the queens, but also the daily life of the ancient Egyptian — how the Nile affected this great civilization. “You have here a history of 3,500 years.”

El Saddik said the fact that many museums around the world have Egypt collections made it relatively easy to get the needed artifacts together.

Content for the exhibition comes from four key collections contained at the Egyptian Museum in Berlin, the Roemer- und Pelizaeus-Museum in Hildesheim, Germany, the Gustav Lübcke Museum in Hamm, Germany, and the University Museum of Aberdeen in Scotland.

The largest portion of the content is from the Hildesheim facility, El Saddik said.

Six pharaohs are being featured, including Hatshepsut, one of the few women who rose to the position. A 3,500-year-old, 790-kilogram sandstone bust of her is among the show’s highlights.

Also on exhibit is a 4,000-year-old wooden coffin that belonged to an official named Nakht. Museum-goers can visit a replica tomb, as well.

The show opening coincides with the annual B.C. Museums Week, a celebration of museums, art galleries and other institutions around the province.

Page 1 of 2