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MANILA, Aug 12 (AFP) — A beaming bride defiantly marching up a flooded church aisle in the Philippines has won hearts as the country suffers a fresh bout of monsoonal rains.

Jobel Delos Angeles, 24, married the father of her two children yesterday as Tropical Storm Yagi and the south-west monsoon brought heavy flooding to the capital Manila and nearby areas, including their home province of Bulacan.

In a Facebook video shared over a thousand times, Delos Angeles is all smiles as she walks through brown floodwaters in a white gown and veil before her suited groom clad in flip-flops takes her to the altar.

“Even if it floods or it rains, nothing can stop me. You only get married once, will you postpone it? I was marrying the man I love,” Delos Angeles told AFP by phone.

“My gown got wet and heavy but I told myself it was as if I was walking on a red carpet.”

The Philippines endures an average of 20 typhoons and storms each year.

The latest storm brought misery to many, with 20,000 residents fleeing the riverside district of Marikina in the national capital region where floods swept away cars, authorities said.

But for Delos Angeles, the weekend was cause for celebration.

She said she and her partner of seven years did not expect bad weather but never considered calling off their wedding even after floodwaters entered the church in Hagonoy town.

It was a double ceremony, with their five-month-old daughter baptised in the same event, she added.

Guests were photographed barefoot, including children who were afraid to slip.  

“We didn’t want a new schedule as we were already stressed out. Our hometown is really flood-prone,” Delos Angeles added.

“No car wanted to bring us to the church so I just rode a boat. We didn’t expect so many people would still turn up, even the entourage.”

NEW YORK, May 16, 2018 (News Wires) - Hundreds of thousands of people remained without power in the US Northeast on Wednesday after ferocious storms packing fierce winds and hail battered the region, killing three people.

Hours after the storms knocked down power lines and trees across the region, some 360,000 customers in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and West Virginia were without power, tracking service PowerOutage.us said.

Schools cancelled classes or delayed opening on Wednesday.

Morning commuters in New York and Boston were expected to face patchy dense fog, the National Weather Service warned, while some commuter trains in the New York City metro area were suspended or delayed.

An 11-year-old girl was killed when strong winds caused a tree to fall on a parked car in Newburgh, New York, during Tuesday evening’s storms. Two other people were killed in Connecticut in separate incidents when trees fell on their vehicles, local media reported.

Local news showed footage of trees resting on top of crushed cars and houses, vehicles submerged in water and residents handling large hail, some the size of tennis balls.

There were more than 100 reports of hail in states including Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Connecticut, the National Weather Service said.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency in several counties in southeast New York and deployed members of the New York National Guard to assist with the recovery.

Officials in Brookfield, Connecticut, declared a town disaster and told residents to stay inside until they could assess the damage.

“Please be aware that there are hundreds of downed trees, utility poles and electrical lines. AVOID all down trees and utility poles as they may still involve LIVE power lines,” the Brookfield Police Department said on Facebook.

Most air traffic was back to normal on Wednesday morning after more than 500 flights were cancelled at the three major airports serving the New York area on Tuesday, and more than 100 at Boston’s Logan International, according to tracking service FlightAware.com.

GENEVA, May 1, 2018 (Reuters) - Two more ski hikers have died after being caught in a sudden storm in the Swiss Alps, bringing the toll to six, while three women remain hospitalised in poor condition, Swiss police said on Tuesday.

Rescuers on helicopters found 14 people on Monday who had been forced to spend a night outdoors in the Pigne d'Arolla area while crossing on skiis from Chamonix in France to Zermatt in Switzerland, police in the Swiss canton of Valais said.

The dead include two Italian couples and their Italian guide, a 59-year-old who died in a fall, as well as a Bulgarian woman who died in hospital on Tuesday, police said in a statement.

Three women remain in hospital - Swiss, French, and Italian - one of whose condition is life-threatening, the police said.

Five people are suffering from lesser hypothermia including three French nationals, a German woman and an Italian.

PRINCETON, N.J., March 4 - (Reuters) - More than 1.5 million customers remained without power throughout the eastern United States on Sunday, and communities on the New England coast faced more flooding two days after a powerful storm snapped trees, downed wires and killed at least nine people.
The remnants of the storm, known as a nor'easter, lingered on Sunday with flood watches and wind advisories in effect until 1pm in northeastern United States even as it moved hundreds of miles out to sea, hampering efforts to restore power.
The governors of both Massachusetts and New York declared a state of emergency on Saturday afternoon, following similar announcements by the governors of Virginia and Maryland on Friday.
The moves give those states access to federal resources.
The storm carried hurricane-force winds in excess of 90 miles per hour (145 kph), sending seawater churning into streets in Boston and nearby shore towns - the second time the area has been flooded this year.
The National Weather Service (NWS) said that while winds have weakened on Sunday and most of the rain and snow has moved offshore, flooding and extreme high tides could still affect the coastal areas from Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Long Island, N.Y.
"We're definitely not out of the woods yet," said meteorologist David Roth at the weather service's Weather Prediction Centre in College Park, Maryland.
Falling trees killed seven people - including two boys who died when trees struck their homes - in Connecticut, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia, according to local media and police. Two others died in the storm, according to media reports, including a 41-year-old man in Andover, New Jersey, who came in contact with power lines.

 

BOSTON, March 3, 2018 (Reuters) - A powerful storm that killed at least five people will move away from the northeastern United States on Saturday, leaving a trail of flooded streets, power outages and brutal winds, forecasters said.

Snow and rain will taper off as skies clear, but winds gusts of up to 50 miles per hour (80 kph) will persist through the day across the region, the National Weather Service said.

In Boston and nearby coastal communities, storm surges and high tides sent seawater in the streets, the second floods there this year. Wind gusts of more than 90 miles per hour downed trees and power lines a day earlier.

Almost 2.4 million homes and businesses had no power in the Northeast and Midwest early on Saturday. Some utility companies warned customers that power might not be restored until later in the day today.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a states of emergency.

"Please use common sense, heed all warnings, and stay inside and off the roads if possible," Hogan said in a statement.

Falling trees killed five people, including two boys, across the region, according to local media and police.

Private forecasting service AccuWeather said the storm dumped as much as 18 inches (46 cm) of snow on parts of New York state and Pennsylvania.

It also snarled transportation from the Middle Atlantic into New England, with more than a quarter of flights into and out of New York's three major airports and Boston's airport canceled, tracking service FlightAware.com reported.

One flight landing at Washington's Dulles International Airport came in through turbulence so rough that most passengers became sick and the pilots were on the verge of becoming ill, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Passenger railroad Amtrak worked to restore service across the region as it removed down tress on tracks. Amtrak said it canceled more than a dozen trains and modified its schedule in the Northeast on Saturday.

BOSTON, March 3, 2018 (Reuters) - A powerful storm that killed at least five people will move away from the northeastern United States on Saturday, leaving a trail of flooded streets, power outages and brutal winds, forecasters said.

Snow and rain will taper off as skies clear, but winds gusts of up to 50 miles per hour (80 kph) will persist through the day across the region, the National Weather Service said.

In Boston and nearby coastal communities, storm surges and high tides sent seawater in the streets, the second floods there this year. Wind gusts of more than 90 miles per hour downed trees and power lines a day earlier.

Almost 2.4 million homes and businesses had no power in the Northeast and Midwest early on Saturday. Some utility companies warned customers that power might not be restored until later in the day or Sunday.

Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and Maryland Governor Larry Hogan declared a states of emergency.

"Please use common sense, heed all warnings, and stay inside and off the roads if possible," Hogan said in a statement.

Falling trees killed five people, including two boys, across the region, according to local media and police.

Private forecasting service AccuWeather said the storm dumped as much as 18 inches (46 cm) of snow on parts of New York state and Pennsylvania.

It also snarled transportation from the Middle Atlantic into New England, with more than a quarter of flights into and out of New York's three major airports and Boston's airport canceled, tracking service FlightAware.com reported.

One flight landing at Washington's Dulles International Airport came in through turbulence so rough that most passengers became sick and the pilots were on the verge of becoming ill, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Passenger railroad Amtrak worked to restore service across the region as it removed down tress on tracks. Amtrak said it canceled more than a dozen trains and modified its schedule in the Northeast on Saturday.